Horse Health

Horse Health: You Can Lead a Horse to Water…

We've all heard the saying "You can lead a horse to water, but you can't make them drink." Horses have to be thirsty in order to consume water, and the lynchpin in that scenario is salt. Dehydration in horses--or any animal--can quickly escalate from mild to catastrophic. Their internal environment is water-based, and salt is the driving force behind the regulation and distribution of water in and out of cells. "Salt is 39% sodium and 61% chloride. When consumed, salt will split in the body into the separate minerals to...

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Horse Health: Alert – Baby on the way!

As we embark on a new year full of hope and promise, 'tis the season for early mornings, sleepless nights and seemingly endless anticipation for those in the breeding industry. Those tasked with helping the next generation of equine athletes enter this world go to great lengths to be on-hand when each foal is born and do everything they can to ensure a successful delivery, or to call a veterinarian if any problems arise. The foaling process is broken down into three stages. Stage 1 being early signs of labor;...

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Horse Health: Microchipping a Superior Form of Identification

Microchipping is quickly becoming the global industry standard for equine identification, especially those being used for competition purposes. The FEI (the International Equestrian Federation--the international governing body of equestrian sports) began integrating microchips into the registration and identification process of horses competing internationally in 2013, and countries such as Australia, Germany, France, Great Britain, Ireland and New Zealand have been using microchips in Thoroughbreds for years. This past year the U. S. Equestrian Federation and U. S. Hunter Jumper Association began requiring horses be microchipped in order to compete in...

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Horse Health: Vaccination Record Keeping & Information is Key

Whenever horses--or those stabled around them--are transported from one location to another, it presents an opportunity for the transport and proliferation of disease-causing agents. For Thoroughbreds, travel is often a regular occurrence, whether it be for competition, training, sale or breeding. Add to that the fact that many of the horses with whom they are transported, stabled or otherwise come in contact, have equally active travel schedules and it is easy to see how quickly a pathogen can potentially spread from a single horse to a group, barn or entire...

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